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Full Version: MerryGold_Motherload Esen Mix
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Yes I'm new here and delighted to find this forum.

I certainly like this track from Merrygold and decided to have a go at a mix.
I haven't recorded or mixed for 6 years and just back on a new platform of PT12. I am an amateur who has played guitar and bass for many years.

I will also point out that I suffer from a moderate/severe hearing loss in both ears with the right being far worse. I mix loud....I know.....but have no choice. It's surprising how my ears respond to my friend's when music is played. Maybe I'm just more aware of what's going on.

I would appreciate any feedback from you guys so I can improve as I go along. Everything done out of the box apart from a bit of Softube here and there. No mastering etc.

Thank you
Nice. Well balanced with a good bit of nuance. Not bad for a deaf guy!
Thanks Mixinthecloud for taking the time to listen. Learning all the time even at 59 years old.
I like the sound in stereo but theres not too much left of your mix when turned to mono. Did you use a lot of stereo imaging? Left channel is much stronger in my opinion - which unfortunately correlates with you stating suffering more on the right side. Always sorry to hear something like this from a musician. Sad
Hi Esen

I like your mix very much
Vocal, other instruments are singing
I feel very happy
I will study in your mix
I would like to mix this song

Thank you very much.
Thank you Yoshi I appreciate that.

There are many other great mixes of this so study as many as you can and come up with your own creation. You will I'm sure be happy with your own mix.

My other mix of a Nerve 9 song is a better mix so check that one out.

Good luck.





(05-06-2017 10:29 AM)Yoshi Nishikawa Wrote: [ -> ]Hi Esen

I like your mix very much
Vocal, other instruments are singing
I feel very happy
I will study in your mix
I would like to mix this song

Thank you very much.
Thank you for feedback.

Hearing loss is a weird thing when it comes down to music. I always have some type of reference and compensate accordingly. Sometimes it works.....sometimes it doesn't.




(09-03-2017 09:20 PM)Mixinthecloud Wrote: [ -> ]Nice. Well balanced with a good bit of nuance. Not bad for a deaf guy!
(01-04-2017 11:54 AM)NoAcoustics Wrote: [ -> ]I like the sound in stereo but theres not too much left of your mix when turned to mono. Did you use a lot of stereo imaging? Left channel is much stronger in my opinion - which unfortunately correlates with you stating suffering more on the right side. Always sorry to hear something like this from a musician. Sad

Quick listen seems pretty balanced to me personally, but my room setup is new and I'm still ironing it out, and not having downloaded it to check switching L/R, or on headphones, or checking the mono, and my head has felt stuffy all winter anyway, so I dunno. FWIW.

(15-06-2017 11:41 AM)Esen Wrote: [ -> ]Thank you for feedback.

Hearing loss is a weird thing when it comes down to music. I always have some type of reference and compensate accordingly. Sometimes it works.....sometimes it doesn't.

You may be doing some/all if this, but here's what comes to my mind that you could try - if theres a new idea in there that helps you, super!

-I often switch L/R back and forth, especially when trying to polish stereo imaging, both in monitors and in headphones. Also I'll be beaming in and out of mono<-> L/R, mono <-> R/L, and R/L <-> L/R, in headphones and with monitors, using my mix, noise colors, and reference tracks, to make sure my head feels centered to my monitors and headphones. If you're subconsciously compensating for hearing differences, it should leap out at you with the L/R switched - if it stays similarly centered no matter which side is getting L/R and in and out of mono, you're probably in the ballpark enough.

-You might look into measuring and calibrating your listening room/getting a friends opinion the room sound, to make sure that where you are *listening* from *is* balanced. If there is a L/R difference in your room, switching L/R might not help, since the room bias would be there still. If your room setup is not *exactly* symmetrical, and your workstation is not *measured with a tape* to be exactly center, that could be a good place to start, to minimize any L/R impact the room might have.

-You could also try working out an EQ/compression preset that attempts to compensate for your hearing difference - if you know the room/headphones are balanced, and play mono signals of tones, chords, drum hits, noise colors, sweeps, and mono/stereo A/B of reference tracks through and adjust the filtering for your bad side until it sounds centered in mono and L/R and R/L, you could pop that effect stack in and out to check how it *should* sound with hearing closer to normal, and do all the switching I mentioned above - just gotta remember to turn it off before bouncing!

-arm yourself with technology! use loudness analysis to look for differences in loudness levels between L/R. Run frequency analysis to check that the overall frequency density of your L/R channels aren't out of sync, and that your mixes frequency density is close to "normal" densities of reference tracks. You'll want to analyze several reference tracks with the same tools, from a variety of genres, to get a sense on how much variation between channels is normal, and what a normal frequency curve might look like. I dont think its something to try to aim religiously at, more of a sanity check kind of thing to see if you're wandering too far off the island. If you need more detailed explanation on what I mean with all that let me know, I don't know your comfort level with tech, but you mention mixing mostly out of box and being older (Im already bewildered (at 37) by where tech is now, and Ive been a computer nerd my entire life), so don't know how well you know some of those tools.

- seek out second opinions on critical mix downs/masterings, from someone in a different room to yours. Id be happy to try to help you if you like, PM me and we can talk about ways to get in touch. I haven't been on the forum in a long time, and don't check email hardly ever, but I finally got a new computer that makes it less tiresome to be on the Internetz and also get any work done, so I might be more reachable.


All of that being said, I think your mix is very good. Sweet, smooth, and clear. I would not listen to it and suspect any hearing issues. With you mentioning it, and NoAcoustics comment, I do feel *kind* of like theres a slight timbre difference between your L/R, but it seemed more an influence of old school type hard L/R panning - that different instruments were more prominent in each side.
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