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Nashville vibe?
03-12-2013, 03:26 AM
Post: #1
Nashville vibe?
This is my first try to mix a country song. Based on my love of old country music, here's my try.

I would love to hear words from you guys!

Myst


.mp3   01 - UNCLE DAD - Who I Am (MystMix 1.0).mp3 --  (Download: 7.1 MB)



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13-12-2013, 10:50 PM
Post: #2
RE: Nashville vibe?
Hi there very nice attempt i like the guitar sound and balance, drums, bass and overall sound. Perhaps i wouldn't pan the left side instrument or i would make it less loud.
Also in mono the guitars tend to dissapear, so perhaps they are too stereo.

Keep it up

Cheers!!

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24-12-2013, 04:54 PM
Post: #3
RE: Nashville vibe?
(13-12-2013 10:50 PM)jorger Wrote:  Hi there very nice attempt i like the guitar sound and balance, drums, bass and overall sound. Perhaps i wouldn't pan the left side instrument or i would make it less loud.
Also in mono the guitars tend to dissapear, so perhaps they are too stereo.

Keep it up

Cheers!!

THanks for comment dude, I appreciate it!

Yes actually I let lead vox, kick, snare, and bass to center and the rest is spread L and R. I always pan LCR and no luck in between. LCR method doesnt work in this particular mix perhaps?

Thanks once again!

Myst

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24-12-2013, 05:45 PM
Post: #4
RE: Nashville vibe?
Nice job ... sounds like you accomplished a Nashville vibe to me Smile[/b]

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04-01-2014, 09:37 PM (This post was last modified: 04-01-2014 09:39 PM by Pedaling Prince.)
Post: #5
RE: Nashville vibe?
(03-12-2013 03:26 AM)MystycalFanfare Wrote:  This is my first try to mix a country song. Based on my love of old country music, here's my try.

I would love to hear words from you guys!

Myst

Outch! Not bad but there's a BIG problem here. What did you do to that snare drum? It felt like I had a guy whacking me over the head with a mallet; it just PUNCHES the ears. Drums should have SOME punch, sure, but there's such thing as too much of a good thing... Confused

Personally, I liked the way you panned the banjo left and what you did with the overall stereo image; it came in nice and wide and pleasant from the get-go, but it seemed to collapse a bit as the song progressed. Did you use compression in the mastering stage? If so I'd try this mix again without it; it'll have more "space."

Speaking of processing, it seems that either you applied too much de-ess processing on the vocals or there's too much EQ boost in the 8-10 kHz range on some tracks that's masking sibilants. This is a star vocal performance; it deserves more up-front presence, and sibilance in the original recording is not a problem.

BTW, I feel this would also sound better if you panned the fiddle to one side the way you did the banjo. I personally prefer the fiddle on the left but that's personal taste really. I think if you put the banjo on one side and the fiddle on the other it would sound a little wider and more "live" stereo-wise.

I'd say dial back on the EQ processing, particularly on the vocals, and if you're using any compression at the mastering stage try taking that out as well.

John A. Ardelli
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13-01-2014, 07:47 PM
Post: #6
RE: Nashville vibe?
(04-01-2014 09:37 PM)Pedaling Prince Wrote:  
(03-12-2013 03:26 AM)MystycalFanfare Wrote:  This is my first try to mix a country song. Based on my love of old country music, here's my try.

I would love to hear words from you guys!

Myst

Outch! Not bad but there's a BIG problem here. What did you do to that snare drum? It felt like I had a guy whacking me over the head with a mallet; it just PUNCHES the ears. Drums should have SOME punch, sure, but there's such thing as too much of a good thing... Confused

Personally, I liked the way you panned the banjo left and what you did with the overall stereo image; it came in nice and wide and pleasant from the get-go, but it seemed to collapse a bit as the song progressed. Did you use compression in the mastering stage? If so I'd try this mix again without it; it'll have more "space."

Speaking of processing, it seems that either you applied too much de-ess processing on the vocals or there's too much EQ boost in the 8-10 kHz range on some tracks that's masking sibilants. This is a star vocal performance; it deserves more up-front presence, and sibilance in the original recording is not a problem.

BTW, I feel this would also sound better if you panned the fiddle to one side the way you did the banjo. I personally prefer the fiddle on the left but that's personal taste really. I think if you put the banjo on one side and the fiddle on the other it would sound a little wider and more "live" stereo-wise.

I'd say dial back on the EQ processing, particularly on the vocals, and if you're using any compression at the mastering stage try taking that out as well.

Hey, big thanks for comment here!

For snare, I only use gate for clear out the bleed, some compression and parallel processing. It's too much for particular song, indeed, especially after I'm comparing with old country tunes. I'm originally an heavy metal mixer, so pardon for that.

Yes I use compression on master bus about 2db reduction. It's not from my mastering but on my mixing, I believe. I heard my mix later and I agreed with you. I should have more creative on automation perhaps.

For vocal, yes I apply boosting on that area, the idea is for enhance the "agghh" breathy thing on vocal. Once again, maybe it's too much for particular song.

Thank you once again for spent your time to write detail comments and critics here.

Cheers!

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14-01-2014, 02:11 AM
Post: #7
RE: Nashville vibe?
(13-01-2014 07:47 PM)MystycalFanfare Wrote:  For snare, I only use gate for clear out the bleed, some compression and parallel processing. It's too much for particular song, indeed, especially after I'm comparing with old country tunes. I'm originally an heavy metal mixer, so pardon for that.

A heavy metal mixer. That explains it; this drum sound WOULD sound pretty sweet punching through a wall of overdriven electric guitars. Wink

I recommend ditching the gate as well. The bleed among the drum tracks is part and parcel of the "feel" of country music drums; the bleed provides the "glue" that holds the drums together in the mix. Basically, in short, I recommend using the drum raw as it is, just balance its volume to the mix. Those Telefunken mics really pick up drums well so they rarely need ANY processing in my experience. Wink

(13-01-2014 07:47 PM)MystycalFanfare Wrote:  For vocal, yes I apply boosting on that area, the idea is for enhance the "agghh" breathy thing on vocal. Once again, maybe it's too much for particular song.

And for the quality of the recording, too. In my experience, heavy processing is only really needed when you're working with tracks that have problems that need to be ironed out; with Telefunken demos there are rarely ANY problems. If taken as an independent recording, actually, each track in a Telefunken demo mix is quite capable of standing on its own with no processing at all. EQ, used sparingly, is only necessary to help instruments in a full mix blend so they don't step on each others' sonic toes, so to speak, making sure the fundamental frequencies of each instrument are given enough space for that instrument to shine. Wink

John A. Ardelli
Pedaling Prince Pictures
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