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'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
12-10-2018, 03:01 PM (This post was last modified: 12-10-2018 07:47 PM by superthrash.)
Post: #1
'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
Hi everyone, this is what I came up with in a couple of evenings. Roughly two 2 hour mixing sessions.

I imagine there's a lot of issues so any feedback would be greatly appreciated!


.mp3   Burial Of Silence - Mix 2.mp3 --  (Download: 5.96 MB)


.mp3   Snare Amplified.mp3 --  (Download: 6.03 MB)


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12-10-2018, 07:49 PM
Post: #2
RE: 'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
I've upload an updated mix (Burial Of Silence - Mix 2.mp3).

Kick, overheads and toms tweeked a little, backing vocals in right place.
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12-10-2018, 08:24 PM
Post: #3
RE: 'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
Not bad. Balances are good.
I would sample a kick and use a clikier one so it cuts through better.
Good job on the low end.. my mix sounds like crap in the low end and I never got a chance to fix it.
If anything I'd just clean some 300-500hz to clean up a lil space there for more clarity.

Keep it up.

"Mixing for me is the opportunity you get to explore a song to detail and deliver the feeling intended. Mixing is more than faders and knobs, Mixing defines the soul of a song."
Saludos!
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13-10-2018, 06:57 PM
Post: #4
RE: 'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
Thanks for the feedback!

Yeah I definitely agree about the lack of click, didn't really hear it until I gave my ears a break.

I'll check out your mix in a bit!
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15-10-2018, 01:50 PM
Post: #5
RE: 'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
I think this mix sounds overcompressed. Not quite sure where the problem lies in, but it sounds like too low threshold in a master limiter. I don't know what are you mixing on (I presume though it's a pair of relatively cheap headphones), but on my monitors it sounds less detailed than a raw mix, especially in the low end range.
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16-10-2018, 12:40 AM
Post: #6
RE: 'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
(15-10-2018 01:50 PM)alexthebassist Wrote:  I think this mix sounds overcompressed. Not quite sure where the problem lies in, but it sounds like too low threshold in a master limiter. I don't know what are you mixing on (I presume though it's a pair of relatively cheap headphones), but on my monitors it sounds less detailed than a raw mix, especially in the low end range.

I mix on a pair of KRK Rokits in a small room with basic acoustic treatment.

Mix was probably the wrong word as this is also an attempt at basic mastering too.

Do you think a lot of the detail is lost through over-compression or does it sound more like an eq problem?

I do struggle quite a bit with low end, never really sure what to look out for and usually just end up scooping chunks out of the midrange.
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16-10-2018, 02:31 PM
Post: #7
RE: 'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  I mix on a pair of KRK Rokits in a small room with basic acoustic treatment.
They aren't bad, but I suspect you've got 5 inch version which isn't quite good at representing lows, as well as all the other small monitors. What I can advice is checking your low frequencies on headphones. They are usually sloppy too in the low range (since small drivers), but the amount of low energy in basic monitor headphones is much bigger than on small desktop speakers. This is better than not hearing low content at all.
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  Mix was probably the wrong word as this is also an attempt at basic mastering too.
So, many of us bedroom producers do the same, as we don't have enough means to pay a mastering engineer to do that in a properly treated room.
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  Do you think a lot of the detail is lost through over-compression or does it sound more like an eq problem?
Yes, it sounds like drums are too much squashed, which results in loss of dynamic range in the low range. This is unwanted, because what we love about the groove section in any genre, be it anything from cool jazz to technical death metal, is pulsation of kick and bass. Overcompression of the mix leads to masking certain frequencies, especially the low range since its dominating energy in any modern production, making the mix sound flat. Try playing your almost finished mixes (as well as masters) with a dynamic range meter (DR or LUFS) on master bus to check if there's enough headroom to pulsate. Don't limit your stuff to heavy clipping. I suggest you to read something about loudness war. As a result of that, streaming services like Spotify use gain correction to bring all the tracks to some desired and clipping safe loudness level, the same you can do with your desktop player when you enable Replay Gain and analyze loudness of all the tracks you've got in your library, so any effort to master a song louder than your favourite band's last album is useless. Remember that the loss of detail when limiting is irreversible, you lose a significant part of your source wave every time it hits the limiter threshold too hard. “Quieter” records actually sound way lot better when gain matched to heavily limited ones.
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  I do struggle quite a bit with low end, never really sure what to look out for and usually just end up scooping chunks out of the midrange.
And so do I, because I mix on a Presonus Eris E4.5. They are the best in their category, but they have a rolloff at 72 Hz (4.5" drivers, so it's expected). What can help you besides headphones is loading a reference mix into your DAW along with the project, putting a multiband compressor onto the master bus, soloing the low end part and controlling the bass that way. The thing is that our perception heavily depends on what do we hear in overall. When you isolate only the low part, your brain doesn't shift your attention to 700-2500 Hz range which is naturally the best perceivable, as it contains all the viable parts of speech.
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17-10-2018, 08:58 PM
Post: #8
RE: 'Burial Of Silence' mix (roughly 4 hours spent over 2 days)
(16-10-2018 02:31 PM)alexthebassist Wrote:  
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  I mix on a pair of KRK Rokits in a small room with basic acoustic treatment.
They aren't bad, but I suspect you've got 5 inch version which isn't quite good at representing lows, as well as all the other small monitors. What I can advice is checking your low frequencies on headphones. They are usually sloppy too in the low range (since small drivers), but the amount of low energy in basic monitor headphones is much bigger than on small desktop speakers. This is better than not hearing low content at all.
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  Mix was probably the wrong word as this is also an attempt at basic mastering too.
So, many of us bedroom producers do the same, as we don't have enough means to pay a mastering engineer to do that in a properly treated room.
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  Do you think a lot of the detail is lost through over-compression or does it sound more like an eq problem?
Yes, it sounds like drums are too much squashed, which results in loss of dynamic range in the low range. This is unwanted, because what we love about the groove section in any genre, be it anything from cool jazz to technical death metal, is pulsation of kick and bass. Overcompression of the mix leads to masking certain frequencies, especially the low range since its dominating energy in any modern production, making the mix sound flat. Try playing your almost finished mixes (as well as masters) with a dynamic range meter (DR or LUFS) on master bus to check if there's enough headroom to pulsate. Don't limit your stuff to heavy clipping. I suggest you to read something about loudness war. As a result of that, streaming services like Spotify use gain correction to bring all the tracks to some desired and clipping safe loudness level, the same you can do with your desktop player when you enable Replay Gain and analyze loudness of all the tracks you've got in your library, so any effort to master a song louder than your favourite band's last album is useless. Remember that the loss of detail when limiting is irreversible, you lose a significant part of your source wave every time it hits the limiter threshold too hard. “Quieter” records actually sound way lot better when gain matched to heavily limited ones.
(16-10-2018 12:40 AM)superthrash Wrote:  I do struggle quite a bit with low end, never really sure what to look out for and usually just end up scooping chunks out of the midrange.
And so do I, because I mix on a Presonus Eris E4.5. They are the best in their category, but they have a rolloff at 72 Hz (4.5" drivers, so it's expected). What can help you besides headphones is loading a reference mix into your DAW along with the project, putting a multiband compressor onto the master bus, soloing the low end part and controlling the bass that way. The thing is that our perception heavily depends on what do we hear in overall. When you isolate only the low part, your brain doesn't shift your attention to 700-2500 Hz range which is naturally the best perceivable, as it contains all the viable parts of speech.

I have the Rokit 8's but like I say, it's a small room so there's probably going to be some some acoustic issues re: bass frequencies.

I'll have a go at the multiband thing though, see if I can get a better idea of what's going on in the low end!
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