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Some not ended mix
27-02-2018, 07:19 PM
Post: #1
Some not ended mix
Hi Boys, please check my 4h mix.
I am thinking to go forward or just leave it as i am weak se Smile


.mp3   A-002.mp3 --  (Download: 8.66 MB)


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24-03-2018, 03:52 AM (This post was last modified: 24-03-2018 04:00 AM by davemcg61.)
Post: #2
RE: Some not ended mix
Some tips - during the first passes, set the volume level and the panning; it's called gain staging, the foundation your building upon. I almost always work from the drum tracks to the bass guitar to the guitars. Then set the group buses for all the drums to a bus, all the guitars to another bus, lead vocals and background vocals each get their own buses. Assuming you've got everything now slightly below 0dB on the stereo out, you can start considering EQ across each individual track. An example, the guitar lowest fundamental tone is 82Hz, so you really don't need anything below there. The low frequencies of a guitar from 82Hz to 500Hz use a lot of power at the bus and stereo out, so they need to be tamed too. Be aware of unwanted noises - like guitar string squeaks and amp hiss that you'll need to remove or minimize. Use the same process for all your tracks - EQ out the unnecessary frequencies and level out the overpowering frequencies. You'll gain back some room on the stereo out, so you can compress tracks that need it, like drums, bass, guitars and vocals. You'll probably wind up eating all of the room you bought in the EQ steps. Now you can balance the buses so the drums and vocals are the loudest (in rock and pop music) and everything else is set below those buses. Especially in lead vocal tracks, like this one, you find that some parts are way too soft and others are way to loud, so you need to set some automation on the volume fader. You'll need to leave yourself some headroom on the stereo out to add effects like reverb and delays. Vocals can be very centered, so a nice vocal delay widens them and can sound nice at reasonably high levels. The performances are what your trying to capitalize and/or improve. The effects are like ribbons and bows on the package. I hope this helps, and I look forward to hearing a second mix of this awesome song.

Peace,
Dave
Mid 2012 Mac Pro, Presonus FP10 Firewire audio interface, Logic Pro X, Native Instruments Komplete 11, Waves 10 Gold, Rokit 6 G3 monitors, AKG K240 MKII cans.
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14-07-2018, 09:59 PM
Post: #3
RE: Some not ended mix
(24-03-2018 03:52 AM)davemcg61 Wrote:  Some tips - during the first passes, set the volume level and the panning; it's called gain staging, the foundation your building upon. I almost always work from the drum tracks to the bass guitar to the guitars. Then set the group buses for all the drums to a bus, all the guitars to another bus, lead vocals and background vocals each get their own buses. Assuming you've got everything now slightly below 0dB on the stereo out, you can start considering EQ across each individual track. An example, the guitar lowest fundamental tone is 82Hz, so you really don't need anything below there. The low frequencies of a guitar from 82Hz to 500Hz use a lot of power at the bus and stereo out, so they need to be tamed too. Be aware of unwanted noises - like guitar string squeaks and amp hiss that you'll need to remove or minimize. Use the same process for all your tracks - EQ out the unnecessary frequencies and level out the overpowering frequencies. You'll gain back some room on the stereo out, so you can compress tracks that need it, like drums, bass, guitars and vocals. You'll probably wind up eating all of the room you bought in the EQ steps. Now you can balance the buses so the drums and vocals are the loudest (in rock and pop music) and everything else is set below those buses. Especially in lead vocal tracks, like this one, you find that some parts are way too soft and others are way to loud, so you need to set some automation on the volume fader. You'll need to leave yourself some headroom on the stereo out to add effects like reverb and delays. Vocals can be very centered, so a nice vocal delay widens them and can sound nice at reasonably high levels. The performances are what your trying to capitalize and/or improve. The effects are like ribbons and bows on the package. I hope this helps, and I look forward to hearing a second mix of this awesome song.

Thanx Dave, i will do my best Smile and will come back here Big Grin
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