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James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
24-07-2015, 01:37 PM
Post: #1
James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
This was the first mixing test of MIX3US v3
This V2 is a polished version of the one uploaded on CrowdAudio
(less reverb on cellos and edited mandolins noises)

Check it out
Cheers
Dave


.mp3   James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG v2.mp3 --  (Download: 9.72 MB)


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24-07-2015, 05:27 PM
Post: #2
RE: James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
(24-07-2015 01:37 PM)DaveDaG Wrote:  This was the first mixing test of MIX3US v3
This V2 is a polished version of the one uploaded on CrowdAudio
(less reverb on cellos and edited mandolins noises)

Check it out
Cheers
Dave

Hello Dave!
You, too, a good version of the track - very soft and full sound.
I was a little distracting mandolin on the right side. This version I like better than CrowdAudio.
Alexander
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28-07-2015, 08:58 PM
Post: #3
RE: James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
Nice ambience you have there, but you made some weird paning decisions. Guitar needs to be more in C , while mandolins 100L and 100R, and cellos 50L and 50R. Your mix lacks warmth and width. 7/10
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29-07-2015, 04:37 PM
Post: #4
RE: James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
(28-07-2015 08:58 PM)Obelix Wrote:  Nice ambience you have there, but you made some weird paning decisions. Guitar needs to be more in C , while mandolins 100L and 100R, and cellos 50L and 50R. Your mix lacks warmth and width. 7/10

I respect your point of view and I thank you for that
Behind the panning decision there's a thought

the centered mandolin talk directly with the voice in a kind of question&answer vibe
the panned mandolin opposite to the guitar balance it in a kind of strumming

my mix is not perfect at all, I know that, but for sure it delivers feelings and emotions
these are what I'm looking for when I listen to other mixes
If I can't feel any emotion I try identify tecnically what processing blocks those

Thanks anyway, always usefull the feedbacks, we all upload here for those
cheers
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31-07-2015, 05:33 AM
Post: #5
RE: James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
I'd advise against spreading the cellos out too much, personally. It's not a good idea to have much bass too far outside the center. That tends to cause comb filtering when the listener is outside the listening position, and in a domestic setting that might also destructively interfere with upright bass and kick.

If you'd like to create some spread in the cellos as obelix suggests, a solution that would translate better would be to use a panned send to a Slap back delay. That would emulate localized early reflections and pull the cellos out a little further without risking translation/mono compatibility.
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31-07-2015, 10:09 AM
Post: #6
RE: James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
(31-07-2015 05:33 AM)Bold Beagle Wrote:  I'd advise against spreading the cellos out too much, personally. It's not a good idea to have much bass too far outside the center. That tends to cause comb filtering when the listener is outside the listening position, and in a domestic setting that might also destructively interfere with upright bass and kick.

If you'd like to create some spread in the cellos as obelix suggests, a solution that would translate better would be to use a panned send to a Slap back delay. That would emulate localized early reflections and pull the cellos out a little further without risking translation/mono compatibility.

You are wrong about slap back delay on cellos.
What I did in my mix is that I hi passed cellos around 100 Hz and then I panned them. Some lows on the side can be a good or a bad thing. It depends on if you like it or not.
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01-08-2015, 05:23 AM
Post: #7
RE: James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
Highpassing them at 100 would relieve a lot of the potential phase issues when panning, and you're right that panning is a matter of personal taste, but you're also cutting out a lot of the fundamentals tones from the cellos when you cut so severely. For me personally, that stuff is too important in this song to sacrifice for the sake of panning.

As for lows on the side, you have to be really careful about that, because it's a potential mono compatibility disaster. This is technical stuff, here. I'm not suggesting the sides need to be high-passed or anything, but that instruments with strong fundamentals in the lows should be kept closer to the center. Everything below 200 hZ is essentially non-directional unless you're in the stereo sweet spot, so panning low frequencies like that won't help really help separate the sound sources and may actually fool you into lazy EQ moves.

The delays I suggested can give you the spread you need without the potential comb filtering/mono compatibility dangers if you keep them very tight, close to the Haas zone, and spread them out. You can high-pass the fundamentals and achieve stereo spread with no sacrifice. If you pan low elements, make sure you're ratifying every single processing descision, EQ or otherwise, in mono before moving on. You should also listen to the music from the other room with the door closed to make sure the low end doesn't disappear or get muddy, because that hints at a potential translation problem.

So take anything I say with a grain of salt, but keep in mind that half of this game is making sure the mix holds up in any environment and on any pair of speakers...
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02-08-2015, 04:58 PM
Post: #8
RE: James May On The Line mixed by DaveDaG
I did not hi passed cellos at 100. It was like 70 to 90- ish region. Cello is tuned in fifths CGDA- from C being the lowest string with fundamental around 64 Hz . Listen to my mix, and decide with your own ears does it sound good or not. And post scriptum, I learned something from your writting about Hass fx.
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